Fine romance: in epistolary form

Dear hearts! The resigned tone of this practically gives me the vapors, and of course the tide is turning for Harriet, as well—both because his absence makes his character clearer to her, and because nearly every single person she trips over has another story to tell about Lord Peter Wimsey. From Gaudy Night, Ch. XI.

DEAR HARRIET,

I send in my demand notes with the brutal regularity of the income-tax commissioners; and probably you say when you see the envelopes, 'Oh, God! I know what this is.' The only difference is that, some time or other, one has to take notice of the income-tax.

Will you marry me? —It's beginning to look like one of those lines in a farce—merely boring till it's said often enough; and after that, you get a bigger laugh every time it comes.

I should like to write you the kind of words that burn the paper they are written on—but words like that have a way of being not only unforgettable and unforgivable. You will burn the paper in any case; and I would rather there should be nothing in it that you cannot forget if you want to.

Well, that's over. Don't worry about it.

My nephew (whom you seem, by the way, to have stimulated to the most extraordinary diligence) is cheering my exile by dark hints that you are involved in some disagreeable and dangerous job of work at Oxford about which he is in honor bound to say nothing. I hope he is mistaken. But I know that, if you have put anything in hand, disagreeableness and danger will not turn you back, and God forbid they should. Whatever it is, you have my best wishes for it.

I am not my own master at the moment, and do not know where I shall be sent next or when I shall be back—soon, I trust. In the meantime may I hope to hear from time to time that all is well with you?

Yours, more than my own,
PETER WIMSEY